Food Hygiene

Interventions to improve water quality for preventing diarrhoea: systematic review and meta-analysis.

Clasen TF, Schmidt WP, Rabie T, Roberts I, Cairncross S. Interventions to improve water quality for preventing diarrhoea: systematic review and meta-analysis. British Medical Journal. 2007a;334(7597):782.

Following a systematic review of interventions to improve water quality for preventing diarrheal disease (Clasen et al., 2007a), which compared interventions at the both the source (protected wells, bore holes, and distribution to public standpipes) and in the household (improved water storage, solar disinfection, filtration, and combined flocculation-disinfection), he and coauthors concluded that household-based interventions were nearly twice as effective as source-based measures. Clasen and coworkers subsequently conducted a cost-effectiveness analysis to determine the cost per disability-adjusted life year (DALY, a measure of disease burden) averted for a similar range of source and household interventions (Clasen et al., 2007). The researchers found that upon reaching 50 percent of a country’s population, interventions involving household chlorination and solar disinfection paid for themselves and that all interventions were cost-effective.

Clasen TF, Haller L, Walker D, Bartram J, Cairncross S. Cost-effectiveness of water quality interventions for preventing diarrhoeal disease in developing countries. Journal of Water and Health. 2007;5(4):599–608.

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Written by geraldmoy

May 30, 2011 at 12:16 pm