Food Hygiene

Archive for the ‘IFH-Home Hygiene’ Category

Proceedings of the 2nd IFH international conference: home hygiene and the prevention of infectious disease in developing countries: a responsibility for all, New Delhi, India, 15-16 April 2002.

Proceedings of the 2nd IFH international conference: home hygiene and the prevention of infectious disease in developing countries: a responsibility for all, New Delhi, India, 15-16 April 2002.
Taylor & Francis, London, UK, International Journal of Environmental Health Research, 2003, 13, Supplement 1, S1-S183,
http://www.cabdirect.org/abstracts/20033098458.html

This conference supplement contains papers, which were presented at the conference. In the first session, an overview session, the potential for infection transmission in the home is reviewed. Other papers in this session include a situational analysis of water, sanitation and hygiene firstly in India and then in the South East Asia region as a whole, together with a paper which evaluated cost-benefit assessments as a means of defining priorities for action. The overview session is followed by sessions devoted to each of the main areas of home hygiene, namely hygiene practice in the domestic and peri-domestic settings, handwashing, water, sanitation, and food hygiene. For each hygiene area, the related issues, solutions and benefits were evaluated in a keynote paper, which was followed by papers evaluating case histories of intervention measures and other community projects. This supplement will be useful for the professionals, scientists and sector leaders, as well as community organizers for promoting hygiene and public health in the developing countries.

  • Publication type: Journal issue; Conference proceedings
  • Record Number: 20033098458
  • ISSN: 0960-3123
  • Language of publication: English
  • Geographical Location: Developing Countries; India; South East Asia;
  • Organism Descriptors: bacteria; fungi; man; Protozoa; viruses;
  • Descriptors: cost benefit analysis; disease prevention; disease transmission; food hygiene; hands; helminths; homes; human diseases; hygiene; infectious diseases; sanitation; washing; water;
  • Identifiers: communicable diseases; parasitic worms; Third World; Underdeveloped Countries;
  • CABICODEs: HH200 – Environmental Pest Management; PP200 – Water Resources; QQ200 – Food Contamination, Residues and Toxicology; VV210 – Prion, Viral, Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens of Humans, (New March 2000);
  • Broad Terms: prokaryotes; eukaryotes; Homo; Hominidae; Primates; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; invertebrates; countries; South Asia; Asia; Developing Countries; Commonwealth of Nations;

Copyright CAB International 2010


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Focus on Home Hygiene in Developing Countries

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Focus on Home Hygiene in Developing Countries

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Sally F. Bloomfield. International Scientific Forum on Home Hygiene

Although, there is good evidence that handling of food, either during preparation in the kitchen, or at mealtimes, with hands contaminated by faecal pathogens, is a significant cause of gastrointestinal infection, infection can also arise from pathogens which enter the food chain during preparation for retail sale. A study in South Africa, for example, showed that 19.2 and 32.3% respectively of poultry products purchased from retail outlets were contaminated with Salmonella and Campylobacter. This means that adequate storage and handling of foods in the home to prevent cross contamination to ready to eat foods, together with thorough cooking, are important to reduce risks of food poisoning.

Unlike developed countries where surveillance data focuses on foodborne infection, there is little data for developing countries to indicate the extent to which food poisoning arising in the home results from foods which are contaminated before they reach the home. In low income communities, however, it is likely that although gastrointestinal infections arise in this way, this mode of infection is “overshadowed” by infections arising from “faecal:food” transmission which occurs after food has entered the home. On the other hand, in homes where there is adequate water and sanitation, it is likely that this is an important route of transmission relative to other modes of spread.

Written by WASHplus

July 21, 2010 at 4:16 pm

Developing and promoting hygiene in the home and community

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Ann Ig. 2010 Jan-Feb;22(1):1-8.

Developing and promoting hygiene in the home and community.

Bloomfield SF, Signorelli C, Fara G. International Scientific Forum on Home Hygiene, Somerset, UK.

The last two decades have seen infectious diseases (IDs) moving back up the health agenda. If the burden of ID is to be contained, the responsibility must be shared by the public. The International Scientific Forum on Home Hygiene (IFH) is working to raise awareness of the role of home hygiene, and promote understanding of hygiene practice.

To develop a strategy for home hygiene, IFH has used the available scientific data to formulate a risk-based approach. This “targeted hygiene” approach maximises protection against infection, whilst minimising any impact on the environment from cleaning and disinfection products, minimising any risks associated antimicrobial resistance, and sustaining interaction with the microbial flora of the environment. IFH has developed a comprehensive range of materials which are being promoted through the IFH website and other channels. Analysis of website traffic indicates significant demand for home hygiene information including scientific material and information in “plain language”.

Written by WASHplus

July 14, 2010 at 4:48 pm

The need for a family centred approach to hygiene promotion

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EUROSURVEILLANCE, Vol 13, Issues 4–6, Apr–Jun 2008

Prevention of the spread of infection – the need for a family centred approach to hygiene promotion

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S Bloomfield (sallybloomfield@aol.com), M Exner, G M Fara1, E A Scott

Infectious diseases circulating in the home and community are a continuing and significant burden on the health and prosperity of the European community. They could, however, be significantly reduced by better standards of hygiene. Across Europe, public health is currently structured such that the separate aspects of hygiene in different settings (food hygiene, personal hygiene, handwashing, pandemic flu preparedness, patient empowerment etc.) are dealt with by separate agencies.

If efforts to promote hygiene at community level are to be successful in changing behaviour, we need a concerted family-centred approach to ensure that a basic understanding of infectious disease agents and their mechanisms of spread, together with an understanding of a riskbased approach to hygiene, are promoted as part of the school curriculum and as part of public health campaigns. Alongside this, we also need unambiguous communication with the public on issues such as the hygiene hypothesis and environmental issues.

Written by WASHplus

July 14, 2010 at 4:40 pm

Kitchen hygiene in the home

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Kitchen hygiene in the home, 2008.

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International Scientific Forum on Home Hygiene

This briefing material has been produced for healthcare professions, the media and others who are looking for background understanding and/or are responsible for informing the public about infectious diseases in the home and their prevention through good hygiene practice.

Written by WASHplus

June 30, 2010 at 7:36 pm

Foodborne disease and the home

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Foodborne disease and the home, 2008.

International Scientific Forum on Home Hygiene.

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This leaflet has been put together to provide background information on foodborne diseases with particular reference to the home. This briefing material has been produced for those who work in healthcare professions, the media and others who are looking for background understanding of foodborne disease and/or those who are responsible for informing the public about foodborne diseases in the home.

Written by WASHplus

June 30, 2010 at 7:13 pm

Guidelines for food hygiene in developing countries

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GUIDELINES FOR PREVENTION OF INFECTION AND CROSS INFECTION IN THE DOMESTIC ENVIRONMENT: FOCUS ON HOME HYGIENE ISSUES IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES, 2002.

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Chapter 3 of this report focuses on food hygiene:

3. GUIDELINES FOR FOOD HYGIENE
3.1. Food preparation
3.2. Cooking
3.3. Meal preparation of cooked food or food to be eaten raw
3.4. Storage of food

Written by WASHplus

June 30, 2010 at 6:12 pm